Quick public speaking tip – Interrupt the flow of theory

Use humour if you can, create vibrant word pictures and tell stories to reinforce concepts. These will allow you to avoid presenting a continuous flow of theory which will kill audience attention and it will give vividness to your material that will make the message last in the minds of your audience – powerful impact.

Foot in mouth?

Every speaker has a mouth; An arrangement rather neat. Sometimes it’s filled with wisdom; Sometimes it’s filled with feet.

– Robert Orben

Foot in mouth?

Every speaker has a mouth; An arrangement rather neat. Sometimes it’s filled with wisdom; Sometimes it’s filled with feet.

– Robert Orben

3 Ways to Use Prezi Big Pictures to Make a Big Impression

Welcome to this guest post from Jim Harvey. Jim helps speakers with his very practical approach, an approach he has developed for himself and his clients through years of research and experience. Enjoy his insights on creating the big picture with Prezi.

A big picture is what makes Prezis immediately stand out from all other presentations, and lets your audience know they’re in for a different type of presentation. Because of its zoom functions, Prezi allows you to put images at the heart of your presentation – even incorporating all of your information into one picture.

No matter how you’re structuring your presentation, there’s probably a way to incorporate a big picture which makes it easier to understand and more interesting to watch. Here are three big picture techniques I use when designing presentations for myself and my clients.

1. Set the scene

Pictures have the power to make us think and understand things which we’d need hundreds of words to convey. It might be a landscape photograph which reminds us of a place we love, or a diagram which shows us how a manufacturing process works. Sometimes one image can explain exactly what your presentation is about – making it the perfect backdrop to your introduction, or window into the subject you’re explaining.
In Prezi, a big picture has the power to set the mood of your entire presentation. You can begin with it filling the screen, giving exactly the message you want to begin with, and even structure the rest of the presentation in and around that image.

A Prezi with an Informative Big Picture

For this Prezi: http://prezi.com/ow8zo7rbkt7v/raise-the-rate/

2. Show the structure of your presentation

A big picture can act like a map – showing where your presentation is going, and giving context to each point you make. This makes your whole presentation work, because it shows how everything links together and relates to your overall message.

It’s a great approach to delivering both short and long presentations, and particularly useful if you’re building up a series of points, for example to argue “3 reasons why xyz”. At the end of the presentation your audience should be able to look at your big picture, and pick out the three reasons you’ve identified.

Prezi with a Clear Structure

(for this prezi: http://prezi.com/y3f0vwjfiayl/we-day/ )

3. Present in a different way

Prezi allows us to plan presentations in an entirely new way – instead of creating an inflexible path through the information in advance, you can simply decide how to structure your presentation on the day. We’ve used this method before by creating infographic type big pictures, which cover all of the information a client may like to know.

When we come to present, we deliver a short introduction and then ask the client, “what would you like to know?” In present mode, you can click anywhere in a Prezi and be taken to that point – from there you can follow a linear path or carry on moving around organically.

Prezi Made for Exploring Naturally

For prezi: http://prezi.com/xtthuex5lynq/prezi-faq/

Jim Harvey is a presentation skills coach and blogger. His aim is to help people to tell stories – about themselves and their products – better. Take a look at his presentation skills blog, or find out more about using Prezi.

Business Presentations that Persuade, Engage and Get results

Own the Room: Business Presentations That Persuade, Engage, and Get Results: How to Deliver a Presentation to Get What You Want

by David Booth

Don’t Just Present. Persuade, Inspire, and Perform!
Powerhouse presentations that engage and move your audience 

Own the Room is written by a unique set of authors with the expertise perfect for creating vivid narratives. Own the Room shares how to excite your audience’s emotions and intellect. And Own the Room will give you a communication toolkit to make any presentation lively, compelling, and memorable. => http://bit.ly/OIMYh4

Business Presentations that Persuade, Engage and Get results

Own the Room: Business Presentations That Persuade, Engage, and Get Results: How to Deliver a Presentation to Get What You Want

by David Booth

Don’t Just Present. Persuade, Inspire, and Perform!
Powerhouse presentations that engage and move your audience 

Own the Room is written by a unique set of authors with the expertise perfect for creating vivid narratives. Own the Room shares how to excite your audience’s emotions and intellect. And Own the Room will give you a communication toolkit to make any presentation lively, compelling, and memorable. => http://bit.ly/OIMYh4

Inspiration quote – change your life

 “It only takes one person to change your life – you.”

— Ruth Casey

Public Speaking quotation

“Be interesting, be enthusiastic … and don’t talk too much.”

– Norman Vincent Peale

Quick public speaking tip … Coping with short attention spans

We all have short attention spans. This is exacerbated in these days of communication delivered in truncated, rapid-fire bytes.

So you have to set up your presentations so that you do something frequently to keep attention.

Change your delivery style.

Support your words with a new visual.

Challenge with an activity for audience involvement.

Tell a story. Whatever techniques you use, introduce them often and vary them.

Each will have its own impact, but make sure that impact supports your chosen image and message.

Norman Vincent Peale on public speaking

“Be interesting, be enthusiastic … and don’t talk too much.”

– Norman Vincent Peale